ENEPRI Publications

Below are links to the most recent publications related to the ENEPRI network. Research findings related to the network are currently disseminated through three channels hosted at ceps.eu:

  • ENEPRI Working Papers constitute dissemination to a wider public of research undertaken and already published by ENEPRI partner member institutes on their own account.
  • ENEPRI Research Reports consist of papers presenting the findings and conclusions of research undertaken in the context of ENEPRI research projects.
  • ENEPRI Policy briefs present the policy implications of research carried out by the ENEPRI partner institutes and published elsewhere in full, often as an ENEPRI Research Report or an ENEPRI Working Paper.

 

Most recent publications 

 

Assessing Needs of Care in European Nations

Author(s): Esther Mot, Peter Willemé
Policy Brief, 28 December 2012

This Policy Brief presents the research questions, main results and policy implications and recommendations of the seven Work Packages that formed the basis of the ANCIEN research project, financed under the 7th EU Research Framework Programme of the European Commission. Carried out over a 44-month period and involving 20 partners from EU member states, the project principally concerns the future of long-term care (LTC) for the elderly in Europe and addresses two questions in particular: How will need, demand, supply and use of LTC develop? How do different systems of LTC perform?
Esther Mot is senior researcher in the Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB). Peter Willemé is health economist in the Social Security Research Group at the Federal Planning Bureau (FPB).

 
 

Performance of Long-Term Care Systems in Europe

Author(s): Esther Mot, Riemer Faber, Joanna Geerts and Peter Willemé
Research Report, 21 December 2012

This report evaluates the performance of long-term care (LTC) systems in Europe, with a special emphasis on four countries that were selected in Work Package 1 of the ANCIEN project as representative of different LTC systems: Germany, the Netherlands, Spain and Poland. Based on a performance framework, we use the following four core criteria for the evaluation: the quality of life of LTC users, the quality of care, equity of LTC systems and the total burden of LTC (consisting of the financial burden and the burden of informal caregiving). The quality of life is analysed by studying the experience of LTC users in 13 European countries, using data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE).

 
 

Statistical Appendices to “Performance of Long-Term Care Systems in Europe”

Author(s): Esther Mot, Riemer Faber, Joanna Geerts and Peter Willemé
Research Report, 21 December 2012

This document provides statistical appendices underpinning the research presented in ENEPRI Research Report No. 117, “Performance of Long-Term Care Systems in Europe”, December 2012. Esther Mot is Senior Researcher in the Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB) and Riemer Faber is researcher at CPB. Joanna Geerts is researcher and Peter Willemé is health economist in the Social Security Research Group at the Federal Planning Bureau (FPB).

 
 

Performance of Long-Term Care Systems in Europe

Author(s): Esther Mot, Anikó Bíró
Policy Brief, 17 December 2012

The evaluation of long-term care (LTC) systems carried out in Work Package 7 of the ANCIEN project shows which performance criteria are important and – based on the available information – how European countries score on those criteria. This paper summarises the results and discusses the policy implications. An overall evaluation was carried out for four representative countries: Germany, the Netherlands, Spain and Poland.

 
 

Technological Solutions Potentially Influencing the Future of Long-Term Care

Author(s): Angelo Rossi Mori, Roberto Dandi, Marta Mazzeo, Rita Verbicaro, Gregorio Mercurio and Esther Mot
Research Report, 20 Jul 2012

This report provides a forecast of the potential direct and indirect influences of various kinds of technologies on the LTC milieu, answering the following question: from a technology-driven perspective: “Consider each technological solution. What could be its future usage in the LTC sector?” Future technological deployments will induce changes in the respective roles of the care recipient and of the formal and informal carers, with an impact on three major concerns: the transformation of the care recipient into a proactive subject, the augmented potentiality for home care and the new functions that informal carers could assume.